History of Wall Panelling in Interior Design Periods


Early Tudor Interiors c.1485-1558

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from rolled parchment and scrolls much the same effect. The design was achieved by cutting out the background leaving the edges as the as high as the surface and only cutting away a minimum of wood to leave the folds outstanding.

In many instances linenfold panels were used for covering the main surface of the wall paneling and a more decorated line of Oak panelling introduced as a sort of frieze or the panels round the  fireplace; sometimes a frieze at the top of the walls carried designs of heads after the Roman style. These were carved roundels and called romayne work. Although their origin was Roman church heads show the contemporary form of head-dress then prevalent in this entry often with a `growing' or `flowering' design so that spaces could be conveniently filled with an arabesque or leaf where realistic portraiture forbade.
This decorative style flowed into the majority of design and a pleasant and fashion persisted, whereby a flower-head might prove on careful examination to be that of a jester in cap and bells, or a grotesque heavily maned animal, or a sleeping baby with bonnet frills. A dolphin could spout shoots, a lady's coif burst into flower, for as long as spaces were filled with pleasant


shapes there was no need to accept nature as more than a guide to imagination. The mermaid and merman appear during the early Tudor period with increasing frequency, their curly tails making a fine starting off point for floral design and arabesque.

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