History of Wall Panelling in Interior Design Periods


Early Tudor Interiors c.1485-1558

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Windows were still heavily barred in the Early Tudor houses. Normally such bars were outside the glass and this can be clearly seen in the drawing below. Glass being comparatively new and expensive was only made in small sizes so that the small leaded pane, which might of course vary considerably shape, was a necessary feature of all the windows of this period. Such glass was rarely pure white, a pale green or greenish yellow or some other pale tint has usual. Though thin and apparently fragile, these delicately tinted panes still to be seen in many old houses. They must therefore have had a tenacity and strength considerably greater than some of the less flawed glass of a later date. The ogee arches, at the top of this very   window, arc of course more typical of an earlier date than Henry VII but traditional styles in architecture were a great many windows with fine tracery stonework to be found at this period still being made for domestic purposes.The stonemason derived most of his knowledge from ecclesiastical architecture, and his early training normally consisted of making pain­staking copies of existing designs which when once thoroughly understood lasted him a life time, and could be utilized again and again.
 



Window at BRADLEY MANOR, DEVONEarly Tudor

 

A much more usual design was that consist ­of mullions and transoms crowned with a four-centered arch with cut-out spandrels. An example of this style appears at the bottom of the next page.

An interesting little window is shown at the top, with wooden mullions and iron bars inside, the glass cut in diamond and lozenge shapes, the smaller panes being originally all slightly darker in colour. A dropped shutter is encased in the wall paneling below the window to pull when required and hook onto the Oak Beam    cover the window. This is one of the earliest shutters included in the actual structure

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