History of Wall Panelling in Interior Design Periods


Early Tudor Interiors c.1485-1558

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Some of this wall paneling is obviously `built-up' or faked but a considerable amount-including the door-is original. Stories as to its history vary considerably but the theory that it has been moved, possibly several times, from its original setting seems more than likely.

The carved heads on the doors reproduce the slightly grotesque head-dresses worn in the late 15th century in England and Northern Europe, and the top Panels in every case show a design of tracery which bears out one story which claims that the Oak panelling originally came from a church.

Similar panels of tracery do, however, exist in all types of Gothic domestic furniture.

The escutcheon and door handle both belong to a later date, but the cock's head hinge is a very fine example of polished ironwork of the period.

A simple and delightful little door of Early Tudor Interior designs for carved Oak panelling workmanship is to be seen preserved in Christchurch Mansion at Ipswich. This door is made up simply from six panels let into two uprights and a cross bar, a board at the top being slotted into the main structure.
The top centre wall panelling is carved in the manner already described as Early English Renaissance; the five linenfold panels are all slightly different which suggests that the design was usually freehand and not copied.

 

The top board wall paneling displays two supporters-a sort of cockatrice and some curly­-tailed animal-holding an escutcheon and arranged in a semicircular cut out space. Cherubs heads with outstretched wings are carved in the corners. The original hinges are still on the door.

 

 

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