History of Wall Panelling in Interior Design Periods


Early Stuart Interiors c.1603 - 1660

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Ham Barton could ever have been, it is extremely interesting to observe that the same Guild craftsmen were free to ply their trade wherever it was ap­preciated and there was no `copyright' on any design employed.

The fourth example is one from King's Langley, Hertfordshire. Bearing the heraldic symbols of James I, the ceiling is divided into squares with a running pattern of flowers and grapes, on a slightly raised rib. The symbols are applied from a cast and are in low relief and although it is undoubtedly the work of Jacobean craftsmen it is still Elizabethan in conception, and delightfully simple in execution.

Comparatively few rooms decorated with the arcaded oak panelling of the early 17th century remain today in their original state. Many such rooms had their wall panelling or wainscot panelling removed within the century when the fashion for long panels commenced. We find fragments of arcaded oak panelling which must have been hidden for a couple of centuries, cropping up as overmantels and chests, bed-heads and tail boards, all re-constituted during the 19th century to make furniture suitable for the Gothic Revival. Many of those homes that retained their Jacobean and Stuart interior wall panelling intact for three centuries, succumbed during the early years of this century to the ever increasing demands (and prices paid) for the antique Oak panelling, wall panelling and wainscot panelling in America, and whole rooms were transported across the Atlantic to grace some wealthy connoisseur's mansion in the United States.

t was probably a style so ornate that few except the generation for whom it was originally installed appreciated its florid detail, but there were never­theless a number of rooms of charm and character in spite of their concentrated decoration. One such room is that of the little White Drawing Room at Chastleton.

 


The White Drawing Room

Chastleton House

 

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