History of Wall Panelling in Interior Design Periods


Early Georgian Interiors c. 1714 - 1760

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The habit of `conversion' was rife during the last few years of the 17th century and the early 18th, and many interesting examples of such conversion can be found throughout the length and breadth of the country. At Bettiscombe, Dorset, the old Tudor hall was converted into a well wainscot room with small sash windows and arcaded columns supporting the ceiling. This oak beam ceiling,a fine example of carved oak-cross-beams, was probably too low for the possibility of plaster work being even considered. It was also too low to paint so the `beams' were painted to match the wainscot and the arcading was fitted into the moulded edge of the beam and a `keystone' added to give strength to the appearance of the colonnade.

 

Small Panelled Room

Small Panelled Room

Early 18th Century

BETTISCOMBE

 

Although in Georgian interiors oak panelling was no longer the only fashionable wall covering, there were a vast number of houses that were still being panelled but not-as was the invariable case in the late Stuart period-with such large panels nor so bold mouldings. Panels might be almost any size or shape and we fined circular and oval panels with curvated shapes or `spandrels' filling the space in design. Long narrow panels and panelled columns and chair rails (a moulding to protect the wall from a too hastily pushed back chair).

 

Pine Panelling and Carved Stone Columns

Pine Panelling and Carved Stone Columns

WESTWELL, OXFORDSHIRE

c. 1740

 

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